VOLUNTEER EXCELLENCE AWARD. Filipino-American Elsie Consolacion (left) received the Volunteer Excellence Award during the celebration of the 61st anniversary of World Medical Relief (WMR) on Nov. 1, 2014 at Laurel Manor in Livonia. Photo shows WMR President George Samson (right) citing Consolacion for her outstanding volunteer service to the relief agency. WMR Chairman Mike Baydoun (center) is shown about to hand over the plaque of appreciation to the honoree. (Photo by Percy Antonio)
VOLUNTEER EXCELLENCE AWARD. Filipino-American Elsie Consolacion (left) received the Volunteer Excellence Award during the celebration of the 61st anniversary of World Medical Relief (WMR) on Nov. 1, 2014 at Laurel Manor in Livonia. Photo shows WMR President George Samson (right) citing Consolacion for her outstanding volunteer service to the relief agency. WMR Chairman Mike Baydoun (center) is shown about to hand over the plaque of appreciation to the honoree. (Photo by Percy Antonio)

[box type=”default” size=”large”] Seen to move to its new location in May or June next year [/box]

World Medical Relief (WMR) will be able to increase by at least 100 percent its delivery of free medical supplies and equipment to needy countries when it starts operating at its new facility in Southfield.

This was learned from WMR Chairman Mike Baydoun when he was briefly interviewed shortly after a dinner-dance program that highlighted the celebration of the 61st anniversary of the Detroit-based relief agency. The event took place on Nov. 1, 2014 at Laurel Manor in Livonia.

Chairman Baydoun said WMR will probably transfer in May or June next year from its old building on Rosa Park Blvd. in Detroit to its newly purchased facility in Southfield.

In his speech delivered during the program, Baydoun said that WMR’s building committee selected the new facility from 44 sites and that the committee was unable to find a suitable site in Detroit.

It was learned that the facility is a one-level structure with a floor area of 62,000 square feet, which is much bigger than that of its building in Detroit. The big area will provide sufficient spaces for WMR’s offices, sorting and shipping of donated medical equipment and supplies.

The Southfield facility will have 14 loading docks that will enable WMR to at least double the number of shipments of medical supplies and equipment for delivery to needy countries.

In his speech, WMR President-CEO George V. Samson credited the  board for working hard in the last five years to find a new, bigger facility that can enhance WMR’s operations that benefit millions of poor people.

“Without these board members, this new facility would not have been a reality,” Samson said. “They want to help billions of poor people.”

He also said, “This new facility will live for more than 100 years, and we will be long gone but it will remain forever.”

Samson handed awards to volunteers who have been consistently rendering outstanding services to WMR.

The recipients of the awards were Mike Baydoun, Marcia Femrite, Michael Krause, Attorney Guy Sohou and Robert Wright, who all received the Excellent Service Award; Nidhal Garmo, International Appreciation Award; Joerns Healthcare, Company Partnership Award; United2 Heal (University of Michigan), Student Partnership Award; and Elsie Consolacion, Volunteer Excellence Award.

Consolacion was the only Filipino American volunteer who received a WMR citation this year. Samson said that Consolacion has been going to WMR four times a week in the last eight years to render volunteer service.

The citation plaque given to Consolacion states, “We gratefully acknowledged your many years of devoted service and appreciate your superior performance, unending commitment and supportive leadership.”Consolacion, who is a retired GM employee, hails from Narvacan, Ilocos Sur, Philippines.

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