STUDENT VOLUNTEERS. George Samson, president and CEO of World Medical Relief (WMR), meets with students of the University of Michigan who did volunteer work at WMR’s new building in Southfield.
STUDENT VOLUNTEERS. George Samson, president and CEO of World Medical Relief (WMR), meets with students of the University of Michigan who did volunteer work at WMR’s new building in Southfield.

[box type=”default” size=”large”] WMR President Samson describes new facility as gift from God WMR President Samson describes new facility as gift from God [/box]

The World Medical Relief (WMR) will officially start its operations in its new building in Southfield on Aug. 20, 2015, it was announced.

WMR President and CEO George V. Samson described the new building as a gift from God.

Samson, a Filipino-American, said that with a floor area of 62,000 square feet and 10 loading docks, the facility will enable WMR to step up its medical relief activities and increase at least 10 times the number of poor, sick people that will benefit from its expanded operations.

The new building, which is located on Melrose Road, Southfield, is much more spacious than its building on Rosa Park Ave., Detroit where the relief agency continues to hold office until Aug. 19.

Samson said the opening ceremonies, which will start at 7 p.m., will be graced by VIPs, including the mayor of Southfield, community leaders and members of the WMR’s board of directors.

During a program highlighting the opening event, Samson will brief the guests on how WMR acquired the building as well as on the various aspects of its expanded operations.

Samson told the Filipino Star News that its new building is a gift from God, saying that the facility was acquired practically free, with WMR spending not even a single cent for its purchase.

He related that when the WMR board was looking for a place to transfer, it had several buildings to choose from. The board selected the building in Southfield which was being sold for $1.5 million, a price which is comparatively cheap.

It was learned that the building was constructed several years at a cost of about $15 million.

The problem, Samson said, was that WMR did not have the money, and so it could not push the negotiation for its purchase.

He recalled that he had just returned from a trip to the Philippines when a lawyer, whom he did not know, called him by phone and told him that his group wants to donate the amount needed for the purchase of the building.

Samson said that with the fund donation, WMR proceeded to purchase the building.

With its big floor area, WMR will have new amenities such as a cafeteria, a big room for the reprocessing of pacemakers and a museum.

Meanwhile, Samson aired anew a call for volunteers to help WMR in cleaning and repainting the new building as well as in the sorting of donated medicines which is now being done in the new facility. Volunteer work is done every weekend.

He thanked people who did volunteer work last Saturday (May 23). They included students of the University of Michigan, who belong to the M-HEAL group. They are Brandon Boot, Trish Dine, Shannon Moore, Evan Jung, Kevin Jung, Emma Callewaert, Page Castle and Faisal Ahmed.

The Filipino-American volunteers on May 23 included Lyle Villahermosa, Neal Postrado, Joseph Postrado, Percy Antonio, Isaiah Antonio, Max Lizardo, Abigail Antonio, Justin Cayao, Jose Cayao and Irma Cayao.

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